Read Press Release On Chavis Carter Suicide, August 22, 2012

Bulleted List of Evidence Below & Debbie Pelley's Comments Before the City Council August 20

 

Following is a summary of evidence that proves Chavis Carter did indeed commit suicide in the back of a police car. Most of the information below has been recorded on video or audio.  We have seen no evidence even attempting to refute any of the facts below:   See link to the latest Police Department Press Release on Chavis Carter Death, August 22, 2012, by Jonesboro Police and link to all the related videos, reports, and many other documents below the bulleted list

I believe Jesse Jackson had most or all this information but still led a march through Jonesboro calling for an investigation by the Justice Department (even though the FBI was called in on the case from the very beginning) into the death of Chavis Carter, and some people are still spouting that the police murdered Carter.

Read the Department of Police Press Release at this link: http://www.wpaag.org/Yates%20-%20Narrative%20of%20Police%20Report%20by%20JPD.htm or by going to KAIT TV website at this link where you will find the videos, reports, and many other documents related to the story:   http://www.kait8.com/story/19149968/protest-over-chavis-carter-at-city-council-meeting-jesse-jackson-plans-visit

Debbie Pelley's Comments Before the City Council In Support of Chief Yates & Policemen, Aug 21, 2012  

Thank you for letting me speak tonight.  There is a simple three-word sentence in the scriptures that says, “Honor all men.” I believe that scripture “Honor all men” is so important because in the heart of every person, red or yellow, black, or white, there is lurking a propensity toward prejudice and even hatred for those that misunderstand us and bring us pain. Diligence is required to keep our attitudes right and to “Honor All Men,” even our enemies.  

Having said that – I know in my heart that I could and would say the same things I am about to say for any man of any race who demonstrates the courage and integrity that Yates demonstrates.  I want to take this opportunity to express thanks on behalf of all of us who support you - for our police department, Mayor, City Council, the arresting officers in the case, and especially for our Chief of Police, Chief Yates who has been so maligned.

Many accusations about Chief Yates have been spread across our nation on probably more than a hundred news reports and blogs. I want to tell you how many good people in our city regard Chief Yates and how people respected him in his last employment as Chief of Police. 

I found online an article about Yates’ departure from that job.  The title of the article is Popular police chief leaving.  It reads in part. “Americus Police Chief Mike Yates only served for three years, but the crime rate went down while officer productivity increased. During his tenure there was zero turnover in the department.” http://www.walb.com/global/Story.asp?s=1763097  April 2004

A quote from another link in 2007 says: “The former police department (Americus, Georgia) that he [Michael Yates] pulled out from the mud and fixed from the ground up, is back to where is was before him, a laughing stock.” This fact can be confirmed by checking the FBI crime reports. The crime rate there has skyrocketed in recent years. http://www.topix.net/forum/city/jonesboro-ar/TDPE9THIEGC0GSL7J"  

Another opinion piece was written in the Americus Times- Recorder while Yates was still Chief of Police there. The article is highly complimentary of Yates and quite condemning of his opponents, and reports:   Yates whipped the department into shape, instilling a new professionalism, better morale and a renewed respect for enforcing the law – evidence of Yates’ effectiveness.  The city’s crime index has dropped from more than 400 last year to 109 in April.  One-hundred represents the national average.  And the APD expects to be the first local law enforcement agency to achieve state certification. Surely all of us, every race, wants to see a reduction in crime.

This Times-Recorder paper also refutes another falsehood that is being spread across our nation - that Yates  illegally ran a criminal history record on Walker, the Vice President of Americus NAACP,  and found Walker  had committed robbery earlier in his life.  I have in my hand a copy of a letter  from the Georgia Bureau of Investigation that clears Yates of any wrong doing in this instance. In part it reads:Mr. Walker was notified by letter on December 17, 2002, that a "Public Record" request had been made on him [by Police Chief of Americus - Chief Yates] and that no violation of Georgia law occurred.” So this falsehood is being spread even when Walker knows the truth.  The article is clear in that this was a particular Vice President claiming to represent the members of a particular Americus NAACP.

There is much more that could be said on Yates’ behalf; but since my time is gone, I would like to say that I do consider the death of Chavis Carter a very sad tragedy, but I also think that it is tragic that our Chief of Police, the two arresting police officers, and the entire police department,  and even the city of Jonesboro, have been so verbally assaulted and maligned.

And once again I want to say thanks, on behalf of all of us who support you, to  Chief Yates and our police officers who are willing to risk their lives  every day while facing the prospect of this type of accusations with every arrest – and doing so with very little compensation and appreciation.  End of Pelley's  comments and everyone gave a long standing ovation for the police chief and the police department.

Letter to Jonesboro Sun printed August 25, 2012

Jonesboro Sun

Letters to the editor:  August 25, 2012

Ridiculous accusations

Hundreds of newscasts and racist blogs have reported on the Chavis Carter suicide in Jonesboro, creating a cloud of doubt or outright accusations against our Jonesboro Police Department and Chief Michael Yates.

Even our own Jonesboro media have largely left our police department twisting in the wind when they could have prevented some of the damage by refusing to allow a few people to grab the headlines day after day with ridiculous accusations. The responsible citizens — the majority — who chose to hold their peace so as not to incite more unrest were rarely, if ever, interviewed or noted.

Following is just some of the information the media could have reported: An article titled “Popular police chief leaving,” with this quote, “Americus Police Chief Mike Yates only served for three years, but the crime rate went down while officer productivity increased. During his tenure there was zero turnover in the department.”

A quote in 2007 saying: “The former police department (Americus, Ga.) that he [Michael Yates] pulled out from the mud and fixed from the ground up, is back to where it was before him, a laughing stock.” The crime rate there has skyrocketed in recent years.

Another article in the Americus Times-Recorder, which was highly complimentary of Yates and quite condemning of his opponents, reported, “Yates whipped the department into shape, instilling a new professionalism, better morale and a renewed respect for enforcing the law — evidence of Yates’ effectiveness. The city’s crime index has dropped from more than 400 last year to 109 in April ... And the APD expects to be the first local law enforcement agency to achieve state certification.”

An overwhelmingly large majority would have enjoyed reading a few facts like the above in their local paper and from KAIT TV, but it didn’t happen. I do commend Chris Wessel, the new editor of The Sun, for two good editorials on the issue and to The Sun and KAIT for posting videos, etc. on their websites. Unfortunately, only a small percentage of people access the online versions of the news, and the majority heard only the negative comments about our police department — comments spread across the globe by other news departments. 

I do want to express gratitude to Chief Yates and our police officers, who are willing to risk their lives every day for our safety while facing the prospect of these kind of accusations with every arrest — and doing so with very little compensation and appreciation.

When I spoke those words at the city council meeting about three-fourths — not almost half — of the 250 people present gave the chief and police department a long standing ovation.

Debbie Pelley

Jonesboro

Posted by WomenAction Group August 28, 2012