www.afaar.orgSchoolToWorkFlyer&Tucker.htm.

School-To-Work (STW)

Coming to your school!

(STW is a.k.a. CAPS, TAPS, Work Development, Careers)

Congressman Henry Hyde wrote this about STW:

•         All future federal funding for ed. support Goals 2000.

•          STW  chooses careers for every Am. worker.  

•          Children's careers are chosen by federal agencies                  

•          Adults changing jobs will have to be retrained.

•          All Americans will have to receive a CIM [a government    

                     certificate] to qualify for a job

     Marc Tucker, the guru behind School-To-Work, designed the CIM.  (At least nine school districts in Arkansas are now developing the CIM.)  Marc Tucker makes these statements about the CIM:

•       The CIM would replace the high school diploma.

•       The CIM  is at the heart of the new Goals 2000.

•       The CIM will be awarded on the basis of portfolios.

•       The CIM should be required for scholarships & honors.

•       The CIM would be evaluated by one single committee

•       The CIM would include philosophy & societal beliefs.        

Policies are already developed to a point of influencing hiring practices of part time students in our state and local community.

Note:  These programs were put into place by the liberal Democrats, but they have been adopted by Republican Administrations who are knowingly or unknowingly following the same blue print the liberals have outlined in numerous documents.  Names and rhetoric change, but not the major goal which is government control.  Marc Tucker, himself, Hillary Clinton's friend, said Texas had laid the best structure for School To Work of any state in the nation.  He said that during the time our present President was Governor. (See also Marc Tucker's Hillary letter: http://www.eagleforum.org/educate)

School-To-Work

     Marc Tucker, Director of the National Center on Education and the Economy (the NCEE) is exerting more influence in School-To-Work than any other one person at this time.  The National Center created and established several other national organizations and programs, most notably the New Standards Project and the National Alliance for Restructuring Education (the Alliance that was named in Act 236 to help Arkansas restructure and with whom Arkansas is now a partner along with New York, Kentucky, and Washington).  The National Center also worked closely with the Clinton Administration to frame federal education and training legislation, including Goals 2000 and the School-To-Work Opportunities Act.  According to his own writings, much of his "vision" for education and the economy have now become a part of national laws and  policies.  He also wrote a 50 page grant for Arkansas where a former Director of  the State Department of  Education is named as a leader in the movement.

     That "vision" was outlined in a letter to the First Lady in November, 1992 just after President Clinton was elected.  He began the letter this way, "Dear Hillary, I still cannot believe you won.  But utter delight that you did pervades all the circles in which I move."  Later that year he put this "vision" into a formal twenty-seven page report or plan entitled A Human Resource Development Plan for the US.   The following are just a few of the quotes from that report:

"What is essential is that we create a seamless web of opportunities to develop one's skills that literally extends from cradle to grave and is the same system for everyone." p. 2

On the page where Marc Tucker describes his vision he says, "We have a national system of education in which curriculum, pedagogy, examinations and teacher education and licensure systems are all linked to the national standards. . . The new general education standard becomes the target for all basic education programs. . . . 4, 8

"A system of labor market boards is established at the local, state and federal levels to coordinate the systems for job training, postsecondary professional and technical education, adult basic education, job matching, and counseling. . . It is all taken care of at the local labor market board office by one counselor accessing the integrated computer-based program." p. 9

"The object is to create a single comprehensive system for professional and technical education that meets the requirements of everyone from high school students to skilled dislocated workers, from the hard core unemployed to employed adults who want to improve their prospects." p. 13

School-to-Work in Arkansas and the Nation

          As incredible as it may seem, right here in America, government policies and practices  are now being developed and implemented that will produce a controlled and managed economy.  These policies are already advanced to a point of controlling hiring practices to prohibit students who go to schools that don't conform to national standards from being hired and from receiving honor awards and scholarships.  Students are being guided into specific occupations of the government's choosing through the educational system; and this guidance is beginning as early as kindergarten, where career counseling and orientation are now being required by laws and policies. 

     These policies and practices are being encouraged and developed not only at the federal level but also at our state and local levels and are being done so insidiously that probably not one percent of the population is even aware of what is occurring.  States, legislators, governors, businesses, and school districts are being deceived, enticed, and coerced with big money, grants, laws, and policies to cooperate in the takeover of our schools and workforce through Goals 2000 and School-To-Work (also called Workforce Development and Careers Education).  And there are plenty of documents available to prove it. 

      In a School-To-Work Conference held in Little Rock in March, 1997, Mary Swoope, the State Program Coordinator for School-To-Work said, "School-to-Work is systemic.  It changes everything.  It is the  whole program."  The speaker who introduced her said Mrs. Swoope had been a leader in collaboration and that practically no state had gotten on board with all departments like Arkansas had.  She also said 90% of schools in Arkansas are involved with some part of  School-To-Work.)

     Lest the reader doubt the above assertions, note the following:

     On February 12, Congressman Henry Hide hosted a conference on Goals 2000 and School-to-Work in Washington, DC which was sponsored by eleven national organizations.  The purpose of the conference was to educate legislators and their staffs about these concerns; and fifteen nationally known speakers (including US and state representatives and senators, journalists, and authors) addressed the issues mentioned above.

     Congressman Henry Hyde, who has  been in the U. S. House of Representative for 22 years and who would certainly not be considered outside the mainstream culture, wrote a two page letter with several pages of documentation to his colleagues expressing his concern this way. 

"All future federal funding for education support President Clinton's Goals 2000 plan, a plan which enables federal agencies to control the nation's workforce.  School-to-Work chooses careers for every American worker.  Children's careers are chosen for them by Business Councils and federal agencies at the earliest possible age.  In some cases that is third grade.  Goals 2000 utilizes America's educational system as the infrastructure for the nationalization of the labor force in the United States."

"The results will be to create a controlled workforce for the global economy and our children will be the 'human resources' for this plan.  Siblings who have already graduated will be forced to return for vocational training and behavioral modification.  Adults who want to change jobs or who involuntarily lose their jobs will also be required to enter retraining through adult education and vocational classes in order to qualify for Certificates of Mastery (CIM's) for future employment.  All Americans will have to receive a CIM [a government diploma] in order to qualify for a job through the one-stop career centers."

     The Certificate of Initial Mastery (CIM) will be discussed in detail later, but a note of explanation may be necessary at this point.  According to its own designer, Marc Tucker, "This certificate 'CIM' would replace the high school diploma and is at the heart of the new Goals 2000 Educate America Act." (Quotes taken from a press release which unveiled this certificate on April, 1994 by the National Center on Education and the Economy - call Andy Plattner 202-783-3668 for information on this ) Amazingly, this CIM showed up on a State Department  timeline of events to take place in Arkansas in the year 2000 - documentation given later.)  Hillary Clinton also recommended this CIM in an article she co-authored in Educational Leadership, March, 1992, p. 10. This CIM indicates that the student has met the basic standards required by the federal government in order to pursue an occupation.  These standards will emphasize philosophy and societal beliefs as well as academics.  That is why three of our four learner outcomes under Arkansas's Act 236 were based on attitudes, values, and beliefs and only one on academics. 

     In one of the first CIM's to be issued in the nation in Oregon in 1994 (of which we have a copy) standards listed on the certificate are as follows:  Involved Citizen, Quality Producer, Self-Directed Learner, Constructive Thinker, Effective Communicator,  Collaborative Contributor, Quantify, Apply Math/Science, Understand Diversity, Deliberate on Public Issues, Interpret Human Experience and Understand Positive Health Habits   The first six standards list what the student is and last six what he can do.  [Not a great deal about academics one could say]

     These reforms are being driven by foundations, bureaucratic organizations, boards, US Department of Education,  US Department of Labor, and of course, our President and the First Lady, who for years have been working toward restructuring our educational system and economy.  Marc Tucker, Director of the National  Center on Education and the Economy (the NCEE)  is exerting more influence than any other one person at this time.  The National Center  created and/or established several other national organizations and programs, most notably the New Standards Project and the National Alliance for Restructuring Education.  Arkansas was in alliance with both of these organizations, and the National Alliance was named in the original Act 236  to help Arkansas restructure.  The National Center also  worked closely with the Clinton Administration to frame federal education and training legislation, including Goals 2000 and the School-to-Work Transition Opportunities Act.  (All these facts come straight from their own materials - documentation given later.)

     Marc Tucker also wrote a letter to the First Lady (this is not intended to be partisan but is just an effort to explain how the powers that be are working because both parties have been deeply involved in OBE and School-To-Work) in November, 1992 just after President Clinton was elected expressing his jubilation, saying, "Dear Hillary, I still cannot believe you won.  But utter delight that you did pervades all the circles in which I move."  Then he goes on to say that people in his circles had been discussing what Bill and Hillary should do now about education, training and labor market policy.  The rest of his 18 page letter outlines his "vision"  for  developing a controlled economy for "human resources."  Toward the end of the letter he says, "Radical changes in attitudes, values and beliefs are required to move any combination of these agendas."

      Later that year Tucker converted the letter into a formal twenty-seven page  report or plan entitled A Human Resource Development Plan for the US According to his own words, much of his "vision" for education and the economy have now become a part of national laws and policies.  In this letter Tucker also recommends creating a "National Board for Professional and Technical Standards" and recommends that "Neither Congress nor the executive branch can dictate the standards set by the Board."  In 1995 Marc Tucker was named by President Clinton to the National Skill Standards Board where in his own words, "he and other leaders from business, education and labor will identify the specific knowledge, skills and abilities American workers need to succeed in the workplace."  (Last quote from Chronological History of the National Center published by the Center itself and other quotes from his material  will be presented later detailing how much power he and the National Center have had.) 

     The following quotes are taken from the above  report, A Human Resource Development Plan for the United States by Marc Tucker in 1992

On the preface page signed by Marc Tucker is this quote, "This report is mainly the work of a small group of people with close ties to the National Center."

"What is essential is that we create a seamless web of opportunities to develop one's skills that literally extends from cradle to grave and is the same system for everyone." p. 2

On the page where Marc Tucker describes his vision he says, "We have a national system of education in which curriculum, pedagogy, examinations and teacher education and licensure systems are all linked to the national standards. . . The new general education standard becomes the target for all basic education programs. . . Design all programs around the forthcoming general education standards and the standards to be developed by the National Board for Professional and Technical Standards" p. 4, 8, 16

"A system of labor market boards is established at the local, state and federal levels to coordinate the systems for job training, postsecondary professional and technical education, adult basic education, job matching, and counseling. . . It is all taken care of at the local labor market board office by one counselor accessing the integrated computer-based program." p. 9

On the page where it talks about the Agenda for the Federal Government he says, "Everything that follows is cast in the frame of strategies for bringing the new system described in the preceding section into being, not as a pilot program, not as a few demonstrations to be swept aside in another administration, but everywhere, as the new way of doing business." p. 11 (In a grant written by Marc Tucker for the National Alliance for Restructuring he  says, "It will require a change in the prevailing culture - the attitudes, values, norms and accepted ways of doing things. . . 'Breaking the Mold' (name given to their pilot schools)  means breaking this system [traditional education] root and branch. . . We will know that we have succeeded when there are enough transformed schools. . . that their approach to education sets the norms, frames the attitudes and defines the accepted ways of doing things. ...Then there will be no turning back. p. 4, 33.)

"The object is to create a single comprehensive system for professional and technical education that meets the requirements of everyone from high school students to skilled dislocated workers, from the hard core unemployed to employed adults who want to improve their prospects." p. 13

"Early childhood education should be combined with quality day care to provide wrap-around programs that enable working parents to drop off  their children at the beginning of the work day and pick them up at the end." p. 23

(A Bentonville Schools Arkansas Goals 2000 Grant states, "It is our belief that schools must change to match parents' work schedules.  To provide for this, the Bentonville School District provides daycare from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m., 252 days a year." p. 4  [According to the government's own figures in1994, costs for half day of Head Start program is $4,2000 per child.  So for a full day, it would probably be at least $8,400 per child, Jonesboro Sun, Dec. 15, 1994.  How can our nation afford this?]

(  Tucker says in his book Thinking for a Living  p 242, , "Thus although the costs to the taxpayers of our proposals are unknown it is safe to say that they will be large: undoubtedly in the tens of billions of dollars and possibly more than a hundred billion a year." 

Tucker also suggests that the US "take a leaf out of the German book" by placing a 1% to 2% levy on business and industry in order to pay for much of this development. p. 18 of  Human Resource Development Plan for the US.  [Speaking of taking a leaf from the German book, it is enlightening to know where Mr. Tucker developed his philosophy about workforce development.  He said in his book Thinking for a Living, that the “former members of the Communist bloc in Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union…have done a better job than we of building human resource development programs….”  (Thinking for a Living  p.xix)] 

     Hillary Clinton was on the board of the National Center, and it has been reported that she received from one hundred to one hundred seventy thousand  in fees from the National Center around 1991, served on the National Standard's Project founding board. and co-authored an article in March, 1992  with Ira Magaziner (the same person who wrote her health care bill)  in the Educational Leadership magazine in which they make many recommendations that would lead to a managed economy and that are consistent with Marc Tucker's writing - the CIM at about age 16, universal levy against businesses for worker training, and a comprehensive system of employment and training boards to oversee the School-to-Work transition..)  

     In a pamphlet called "Workforce Skills Program by the National Center" Marc Tucker describes the extent of his and the Center's influence this way:

"In 1989 the National Center created the Commission on the Skills of the American Workforce.  One year later, the Commission's report, America's Choice: high skills or low wages reframed the national debate about schools, jobs and the future of American prosperity.  Many of the ideas in America's Choice are now law or on their way to becoming law." [Hillary Clinton was Co-Chair for Implementation of the Commission,]

"With leadership from the executive branch, Congress has passed legislation that establishes challenging national education goals, a national board to oversee development of voluntary skill standards for occupations, and more quality school-to-work programs for students.  National Center staff regularly consult with leaders from the Clinton administration, Congress, governors, and industry, labor and education groups.  And we organize coalitions of major national organizations to build consensus on emerging education, employment and training issues. We help state leaders draft legislation, then develop strategic plans for implementing new education, training and employment systems."  [And all the time they are telling the public that all this is locally controlled?]

"Building on the recommendations made in America's Choice  about the national labor market system, we have been conducting a program of research and analysis related to the idea of establishing one-stop local employment and training centers that provide a wide range of essential services for job seekers.  In our vision, a fully computerized system would list job openings and job-seekers, (with their qualifications.  It would provide information about skills in demand, describe all the institutions in they are offering relevant professional and technical training, as well as detailed information about their track records in helping people meet the new skill standards.  Counselors would be available to help people asses their needs, plan a program, finance it and, once they are trained, find a job." [In his letter to Hillary Marc Tucker says it this way, "It is all taken care of at the local labor market board office by one counselor accessing the integrated computer-based program."  [Perhaps this is the reason President Clinton so aggressively pushes computerization.]

     As mentioned earlier, these educational reforms have already advanced to the point of influencing and controlling hiring practices at the national, state and local levels.  In a School-to-Work seminar held in Little Rock  in March, 1997 Mary Swoope, the State Program Coordinator for School-To-Work, gave the participants material that made the following recommendation for businesses. "Implement hiring practices that will require applicant to demonstrate academic achievement and workplace experience through school-based records such as certificates of mastery, portfolios, industry skill standards certification."  Another recommendation was, "Re-engineer employment practices to use educational institutions as preferred suppliers."

      Mr. Paul Whitley from Tyson Foods, the speaker who represented business at this same Seminar, told about a manager at McDonald's entering into an agreement with  a school administrator to hire only students as part time workers from a list the administrator compiled. Of course, these practices would cut out students from home schools, private schools, and even public schools that choose not to be controlled by the federal government.  Even though students in home schools and private schools score considerably higher (home schoolers in some states score as much as 30 points higher) than the average student in public schools, they would be cut out of the job market.

     As mentioned earlier In the above seminar, Mary Swoope, the State Program Coordinator for School-To-Work said, "School-to-Work is systemic.  It changes everything.  It is a whole program.".  The speaker who introduced her said Mrs. Swoope had been a leader in collaboration and that practically no state had gotten on board with all departments like Arkansas had.  She also said 90% of schools in Arkansas are involved with some part of  School-To-Work.)

       One way schools are getting on board is with CAP  or TAP type programs.   There are many different acronyms, or really, aliases for these adviser programs, but they are basically all the same thing.  They are funded frequently through federal grants from Vocational Education, such as Carl Perkins money, and can be funded through STW or through a companion GOALS 2000 grant.  [At a Transition Team meeting this summer the topic of STW came up with members of the Arkansas Department of Education.  They stated that Vocational Education runs that program, with Federal money going to Vo-Tech.  All of the ADE participants expressed dislike for STW and said they had been concerned with it because at 8th grade, students make the decision which track to enter, and this is way too early for students to make that decision.  They stated that it was the European system that used this strategy, but in the U.S. students always had the chance to go on through college.  They also said that students taking applied math and applied science are in one track and students in other math and science classes are in the college track.  They said that the student taking applied math has to take two years to get the same credit as the student taking other math courses.  One member said that supposedly students can change tracks, but that is not really so.  They also mentioned that students change as they get older and it is not good for them to be locked in.]

     These CAP, TAP or teacher advisery programs are sold to parents and faculty as a way of helping students do a more efficient job of selecting classes and keeping up with graduation credits, and helping give direction to students’ vocational and educational futures.  And the majority of local people who are working on this are people who are very concerned with students’ futures. 

       However, when you look at the documents handed out to teachers and parents, it’s obvious that you’re dealing with a STW program.  CAP or TAP programs will mention the implementation of items such as:

                               Teachers as career counselors

                               Career majors beginning in ninth or tenth grade (STWOA requires

                                         that all students in a STW system choose a career major by the

                                         beginning of junior year of high school

                               Integration of Academics and Vocational Education (This is where all

                                      academic subjects like math and English must be taught within the

                                      framework of business and industry [Integrated curricula is a

                                          recurring theme in STW programs.  STW legislation requires that

                                      grant acceptees totally “integrate academics with vocational

                                          training”.  This means that teachers will have to make all learning

                                      (academic subjects) relevant to some aspect of business or industry. 

                                      “Employers become joint partners with educators to train students

                                      through paid work experience for jobs that exist in the local

                                          economy.” (quotation from a government analysis of STW legis-

                                      lation)  Several local districts which have formed an educational

                                      consortium are currently involved in having businesses help develop

                                      curricula in selected areas such as math and science.]     

                               Secondary and Post-Secondary Articulation   (This allows students to

                                      transfer high school credits to colleges.  One STW coordinator said

                                      during the ACT conference that this had to be done, at times

                                      through forced legislation, because colleges and universities weren’t

                                      always happy with this arrangement.)         

                               Development and maintenance of CAP folders (career portfolios) by the

                                      teacher adviser 

                               Partnerships between school district and business and industry 

                                         (These partnerships are already in some school districts in                        Arkansas which will lead to business boards helping develop the school's curriculum in classes such as math and science.)

 

       According to documents provided by the ERIC database, teacher adviser programs also address personal, social, and academic concerns, and are frequently of concern to teachers who “have never had a guidance course and … are unsure of how to lead a group discussion with adolescents….”  [This ‘guidance’ will also create concern among some parents who may not want just any teacher counseling their children on personal issues.]

       The STWOA mandates that students be “introduced to career exploration and counseling at the earliest possible age, but not later than seventh grade.”  Some teachers in Northeast Arkansas area actually obtained a grant through the Arkansas Dept. of Ed. to implement a program called “Switch to the Right Track for Careers”.  It introduces students to jobs in fifteen major career clusters and integrates state goals for career education into the curriculum.  The students in this program are in the first grade.   (Jonesboro Sun, August, l996)

       Career counseling at the earliest age also involves extensive assessments for students.  During the afternoon plenary session  of the ACT conference, t 1997 two of the keynote speakers, Director of Higher Education, Lu Hardin and Director of Vocational Education, Stephen Franks spoke on the need for more career assessments in elementary grades.  Let me quote to you what was said.

                       “From ACT (or careers) perspective, 8th grade assessment is too late.  We

                   need first through fourth grade assessment that feeds back courses into the

                   elementary curriculum and evaluates academic abilities.”  Then came this

                   remarkable statement, “We need to preserve 8th grade assessment and also

                   second, third, or fourth grade level to assess math skills for college.  We

                   need to give training to facilitators to allow students not to feel bad about

                   NOT going to college.”  [Of course what we’re talking about here is the actual

                   selection by fourth grade of students who are NOT considered “college” material.]

       This philosophy has caused concern even among some members of the Arkansas Board of Vocational Education, who stated recently in an article in the Democrat Gazette  that  “the recent Workforce Development Bill [which aligns with STW legislation] encourages schools to steer students toward vocational studies sooner and to de-emphasize basic skills such as reading and writing.”  March 26, l997.

       STW  also shifts the purpose of education from one of educating thinkers to one of  training workers to fit the occupational  skills that the National Skills Standards Board sets up (Remember that the president appointed Marc Tucker to that board which was set up under Goals 2000.)  According to the original STW grant for Arkansas which was applied for under Governor Jim Guy Tucker, “Arkansas’ goal is to produce skilled, work-ready entrants for the workforce” and “Success will be measured by asking two simple questions:  (a) Does the STW system adequately prepare all students to contribute to Arkansas’ economy; and (b) Does it strengthen Arkansas’ participation in the global economy?”   (There’s not much here about educating thinking, literate, well-rounded adults, is there?)  Governor Huckabee allowed this grant to die without implementing it, but submitted a similar STW application himself in May, 1998.

       Speaking of assessments, it’s not just the very young who are being assessed for career potential.  Recently a 16 year-old girl from Wichita, Kansas, Jenny Potochnik wrote a letter to the editor of the Wichita Eagle about STW issues at her school.  She told about taking the ACT Work Keys.  (Is that test familiar to anyone here?  It is being used here in Arkansas also.)  She took this test over a 10-hour period, as required for graduation.  Here is what she said.

                   “An audio tape of a conversation phone conversation was played for us

                   and we were to take down the message in detail.  Taking phone messages.

                   Now that’s a good thing to test high school students on!  Everyone I talked

                   to thought it was stupid.

                   “A video tape was played showing us how to transfer a phone call.  We were

                   instructed to press flash the extension number, then flash again.  Our

                   multiple choice question was:  After pressing flash and the extension number,

                   what button do you press?  At that point, I was beginning to wonder exactly

                   why I had gotten out of bed.  I could have taken this assessment in my sleep!

                   “Then came the floor-mopping question.  We were instructed by video on

                   how to mop a floor.  Then we were given a scenario in which the person

                   mopping did something wrong.  We were supposed to say what went wrong. 

                   “The math section had 32 questions based on simple arithmetic; no algebra.

                   The reading  part consisted of brief work memos and simple questions about

                   their contents.  And a technology section asked about the nuts and bolts of

                   running a golf-course sprinkler, repairing refrigerators and vacuum cleaners,

                   and installing electrical outlets.  I am a high school student, not an appliance

                   repairman or electrician.”

       But, according to the SCANS (Sec. Comm. On Achiev. Necess. Skills), all schools must teach all students to be able to “select equipment and tools, apply technology to specific tasks, and maintain and troubleshoot equipment,”  and  “work on teams, teach others, serve customers, lead, negotiate, and work well with people from culturally diverse backgrounds.

       In another STW/ERIC document entitled “STW  Transition in the K-12 Classroom” the authors laud schools such as Central Valley High School in Veradale, Washington, which has reorganized its curriculum around six career paths in fields such as business marketing and management, technology in society, and creative and applied arts.  Freshmen choose a career path and devise a 5-year course plan to employment.”  They also cite schools in Kalamazoo County, Michigan, where students “spend up to 10 hours per week gaining onsite exposure to health care occupations, the hospitality industry,…plastics, paper technology….” “Students in Tulsa’s Craftsmanship 2000 program spend 4 hours per day in academic classes and the other 4 on the machine shop floor.”

     Keep in mind that STW programs require that, and I’m quoting again here, “all students actively and regularly participate in all aspects of career counseling.”  According to Marc Tucker in his booklet,  The Certificate of Initial Mastery: A Primer,  there will be “one standard for all students, not different standards for different students.”  That concept is reinforced in STWOA.

       The manpower necessary to enable schools to do this requires that teachers become career counselors.  One STW coordinator at the recent ACT conference stated that “Faculty will design career pathways” and that she sees “Every teacher assuming responsibilities of career educators.”  She went on to discuss that in her program every teacher has to have shadowing and internship experience.  If they complete this experience they are given work growth credit.  [That comment should have new meaning for teachers in Arkansas, given the flyer that teachers received recently from the Teacher Licensure Department.  Another quote,  “Q. Will teachers currently in the field be required to meet the same requirements as new teacher candidates?  A. No, teachers currently teaching will only be impacted at time of licensure renewal, which will be tied to meaningful professional development.”  I think it’s a safe assumption that internships and shadowing will eventually be required for continuing licensure in Arkansas, given current trends.]  These internships are already happening in N.E. Arkansas.  An article in the Sun, dated July 8, l996 highlights educators in our area who areinvolved in internships with local businesses.  This is being done through a consortium of local businesses, the university, and local schools.  Consortia are the way many of these programs are coming into the school systems.  By the way,  when you calculate the stipend that teachers are given for these internships, it factors to about $10.00 an hour.  That’s not a bad deal for business, given the levels of education and experience most teachers bring with them.

      Of course, these ideas come straight from Marc Tucker and the National Center and the elitists in his circles.  In a recent meeting sponsored by the National Center and Marc Tucker, they distributed a booklet called Taskit and Implementation Guide where they outlined their strategy in terms of "articulation agreements."  These are agreements between the schools and businesses in which businesses guarantee hiring preferences or hiring commitments for those students who have earned the CIM over and above those students who now hold diplomas.  According to this guide, students who don't earn a CIM will not be eligible for honor programs, or awards like valedictorian, or scholarships.  These sanctions and rewards are designed to leverage the restructuring of our schools.

   STW opponents were aware these things were coming because in Oregon (a state that has mandated all aspects of Goals 2000 and School- to-Work ) tried to pass a law that employers could not hire students unless they had earned a CIM.  At the local area here in Jonesboro there have been some recommendations concerning hiring practices.  In 1997  Jonesboro received a High Schools that Work report that included various recommendations.  The following is one of the recommendations, "Compile a list of employers who hire current students" and  encourage them to "use student grades and attendance history for initial employment as well as work-site promotion and pay increases."  (These grades could easily be switched later to the requirement for the CIM.)  Then the report challenges the district to move rapidly to implement the School-To-Work CAP's guidance and advisement program patterned after one in Springdale in Arkansas and to develop a career planning curriculum.  And again all of this is supposed to be coming from the teachers and the parents at the local level.

       School- to -Work  Goals 2000 and OBE in their  final form requires certificates of mastery; and according to Marc Tucker, "This certificate 'CIM' would replace the high school diploma and is at the heart of the new Goals 2000 Educate America Act." (Quotes taken from a press release April, 1994 by the National Center.   The Certificate of Initial Mastery is the first certificate (that is why it is called the initial certificate) and indicates the student has met the basic standards required by the federal government

       As mentioned earlier, according to a Arkansas State Department document called an Assessment Rollout,  Arkansas is to have Certificates of  Mastery  in place by 2000.  This  document was taken from a large notebook of training materials whose title page reads: "ARKANSAS ASSESSMENT ALTERNATIVES," Arkansas Department of Education, Research and Design Team 1994-95)

    These certificates shift the purposes of education from one of educating thinkers to one of educating and training workers to fit the occupational skills that the National Skills Standards Board sets up (remember Clinton appointed Tucker to that Board that was set up under Goals 2000.)    These certificates also shift the purpose of education from what one knows to what one can do and are subjective rather than objective.  A student now receives a diploma based on grades given by numerous teachers K-12.  The CIM will be awarded on the basis of projects, demonstrations, and portfolios which will be judged by a committee comprised of school and agency partners. That is why OBE and School-To-Work advocates are trying to eliminate grades and substitute portfolios in their place, and it is also why they are emphasizing all this "hands on learning." An article in the Arkansas Democrat Gazette dated August 2l, 1994 describes it this way. 

    Quentin and Amber were among 100 sophomores at Cottage Grove High School Oregon] who made history in June, when they were awarded certificates of initial mastery . . . aimed at replacing traditional credits, grades and eventually, the high school diploma. . .Quentin Hagewood proudly recalls the computer assisted presentation on rain forests . . .'I  was showing that I could use technology, and I gave a persuasive speech against destruction of the rain forests'. . . A classmate, Amber Advise, also remembers, with no particular pride, her final presentation to a panel of teachers and parents to earn the same certificate.  Among other things, Amber, 15, demonstrated that she knew how to make transparencies used in overhead projectors to flash images on big screens. . .'I wasn't scared about doing the presentation because there wasn't much to it,' she says.  'A 2-year old could have done it'. . .  She says students spent much of their time writing essays describing their feelings about themselves and their interaction with others. 'I don't feel like I know anything,' Amber says, A friend of mine goes to a different school.  She talks about all these different things she's learning.  I can't compare with her.'

.     The following quote from The"Taskit and Implementation Guide" by the National Center given in Mr. Tucker's Conference in San Antonio are illuminating:  "Students would demonstrate their skill knowledge in these programs by completing a senior project and submitting their portfolio to an advisory committee comprised of school and agency partners. Students choosing this option would also be required to complete their high school English and government requirements through independent study."  [Incidentally, this particular document is only given out to attendees at Mr. Tuckers Conferences.  It is not available in any other way.]

     After the CIM is received, the students can go on to receive other certificates.  Some students will pursue career paths that lead them on to college, but the vast majority will be directed into vocational training.  After two years or more in a particular career path, students can receive a the advanced mastery certificate and be guided into a particular job.  In a recent conference Mr. Tucker gave three possible options that could occur in a student's education after receiving the initial certificate or  CIM.  But all three options led to some type of structured on the job training that lead to an occupational skills certificate (This applies even to those that go on to college) Recently Tucker (in the First Annual Standards Based Conference in San Antonio) spoke of a national system of skill standard certificates within sixteen areas of economic activity which cover the whole of the American economy, i. e. communications, manufacturing, retail sales, construction, etc.  In essence then all schools and colleges will be aligned with  vocational training schools.

     A press release dated April, 1994,  by the National Center directed by Marc Tucker  dated April, 1994,  contains the following statements:

"The National Center on Education and the Economy today unveiled the design for a new, world-class standard of achievement for American students. . .This certificate, or 'CIM' would replace the high school diploma."

"This certificate . . . is at the heart of the new Goals 2000 Educate America Act that President Clinton signed into law last month. ["Must have been prepared in advance to be ready this soon.   Too bad that the legislators who voted on Goals 2000 were not given this information before voting on the law.]

"The work behind the CIM is. . .the New Standards Project."

     In a booklet, The Certificate of Initial Mastery: A Primer,  dated April,  1994, Marc Tucker, makes these revealing statements about the CIM.

"We would abolish vocational education as we know it and at the same time give it new life as an essential element in a new form of upper secondary education." (p. 18)  [In essence all schools and colleges will become vocational education.]

"The Certificate of Initial Mastery would represent one standard for all students, not different standards for different students. (p". 8)  [This is why OBE and School-to-Work advocates want to do away with all honor courses and competition and why "inclusion" is being pushed on the schools.  People are limited in their accomplishments because of their aptitude and IQs regardless of how well they are educated or "trained."  Those with average IQs or above would have to held back  since those with below average can't come up.]

"High School students will get their Certificates at widely varying ages." (p. 13) [There will be no deadlines for students;  no deadlines and no grades will promote irresponsibility and drastically reduce motivation.]  A recent report inserted in the April School Board Agenda  of a local school suggested that the school implement “a “No fail” policy. Such policy would require students who  fail a test in any class to attend one to three tutoring sessions and then retake another version of the test.  This process is repeated until the mastery of basic content is achieved.”  [What is it going to be like to try to remediate students who can’t fail?] 

"The Certificate of Initial Mastery is intended to be the first tier in a three-tier system of national education and training standards. . .At the second tier of the standards system are skill standards for clusters of occupations requiring broadly similar skills. . . People meeting the standards in a particular cluster area would get a skills certificate."

"We envision an assessment system for the Certificate that is largely based on the quality of work contained in a portfolio of student work accumulated over several years." (p. 9)  [On the Rollout by the State Department that refers to the CIM,  it  also says that "portfolios are  piloted in 1994-95 and all school maintain portfolios in 1996-97."  In a large grant written in 1993 Burton Elliott (former Director of the Department of Education) he outlines the plan for implementing portfolios assessment statewide.  In other material, OBE proponents say grades should be replaced with portfolios.]

"A school district would probably have Certificate award ceremonies every few months, rather than just once a year, since students should be able to get their Certificates as soon as they have earned them."  (p. 9)  [Each student would have an individual education plan.  Can you imagine the turmoil in a classroom and the extra work on the teacher?]

"The states and districts that joined New Standards did so to develop performance assessments benchmarked to national and international standards."  (The Rollout that refers to CIM's names benchmark exams in almost every phase of the timeline.)

"The standards for the CIM will be set by the Governing Board of New Standards Project." (p. 11)  [a 65 member appointed national board that has very little teacher representation.]  The content standards being used will be derived from the national consensus standards being developed subject by subject by the relevant professional societies." (p. 9-11)  [Remember the national history standards that were so biased that the Senate rejected them 99-1.  Content standards is now the term used in Arkansas for the standards that took the place of basic skills.]

     Marc Tucker used the following quote as his closing statement in an article in Educational Leadership, (March, 1992, p.)  "There's no system like it in the world, but we think that if this country can, in fact, adopt such a plan and make it work, we will have the finest education system in the world."   As quoted earlier Marc Tucker said that his programs may cost more than a hundred billion a year (p. 242 Thinking for a Living)  In essence then Goals 2000 and School-To-Work's proponents want the taxpayers to spend these billions of dollars  on an experiment - an experiment with the entire nation's educational system and economy -  an  experiment that has never been tried anywhere in the world.

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