How IBO is Anti-Religious Description of International Baccalaureate

Description of International Baccalaureate (IB) Education by Director Himself

IB Is The Anti Christian Education Program Being Implemented in Arkansas

 by 2005 Law

 

shttp://universities.ibo.org/ibo/index.cfm?contentid=54DF3F23-DA44-6BB7-59B5C0EC6D1C2566&method=display&language=EN

 

International Baccalaureate Director George Walker says there are three parts to the IB curriculum, the compulsory part, the extra curriculum or co-curriculum part; and then in his own words,  the   "hidden curriculum, the informal but influential rules, beliefs and attitudes that determine the transmission of norms and values.  And these are not the norms and values of the typical US citizens.

 

The quotes below from the General Director George Walker of International Baccalaureate Organization  explain what an International Baccalaureate student is taught and the philosophy behind the teaching.   George Walker spoke these words in August 2005 shortly before he turned the office over to a new director.  These types of speeches are not posted on the normal  IBO website; they are too revealing. It does have an IBO link however so it is official.

 

What global education is and what it is not

 

Walker  explains what global education is and what it is not.  First, global education  is not what the average US citizen would think it is.  It is not international awareness of other nationalities and their views, culture, and values;  and it is not an academic education that prepares the student for international employment.

 

 Instead Walker  explains that a global student education is one that changes the belief system of the student so that the student no longer believes in patriotism and nationalism or the religion passed down by his culture. And it  produces a citizen, in Walker's  own words again, with the "skill of persuading [other] people to compromise or change their minds" as well, a citizen with  "both the ability and the attitude that wants to shift another person’s position as well as their own." (And they accuse the Christians and the conservatives  of wanting to impose our religion and conservative views on society.)

 

Who defines truth?

 

Walker says truth is examined and "refocused" in all areas,  including "religion and ethics."  In other word, IB's  truth transcends any truth we have had passed down to us through our religion.  Truth comes through the student's own inquiry and experiences.  Therefore, there is no truth or absolutes (of course, none but theirs).  Or as Walker says, "How do we reconcile a spirit of inquiry with a patriarchal culture that values received wisdom and rote learning? How can a secular curriculum be adopted in a country where religious faith, rather than empirical observation, defines the limits of truth? Is it possible to be a free-thinking individual, perhaps perceived as amoral, in a culture where the rules and rituals are unconditionally accepted and rigorously adhered to?"  [Note the reason for doing away with rote learning – it is received wisdom]

 

 We see now the reason for doing away with textbooks (received wisdom), student centered learning,   and using the teacher as a facilitator rather than an authority.  This approach  promotes inquiry and trains the student to be his own expert and authority rather than his culture and religion.  IB has  to break down the students' religious viewpoints and patriotism to make them open up to believe that one religion is equal to another (that is every religion but the Christian religion and it is always under attack because it must be broken to produce the citizens they want.)  Nationalism must be broken down because most nations reinforce a predominant religion. The end result, one world order and one world religion, Humanism.

IB is rooted in the Humanist tradition

 

Another International Baccalaureate document says the IB program "grew from a western humanist tradition.  ("Continuum of  International Education, The Primary Years Programme, PYP, from the IBO website at this link: http://www.ibo.org/programmes/documents/continuum.pdf

 

In order to understand the philosophy of IB, it is vital to understand what the IBO means when it states: the IB Programme is rooted in a “western humanist tradition.

 

The U.S. Supreme Court recognized Humanism as a religion in 1961(Torasco v Watkins, 367, US488, June 19, 1961) As such, the American Humanist Association has its own

religious tax exemption and its own clergy (Humanist Celebrant).

 

The basic precepts of the Humanism include:

 

 

Ethics paragraph from the Humanist Manifesto II reads:  "We affirm that moral values derive their source from human experience. Ethics is autonomous and situational needing no theological or ideological sanction. Ethics stems from human need and interest. To deny this distorts the whole basis of life. …We strive for the good life, here and now."

http://www.americanhumanist.org/about/manifesto2.html  

 

Do you want truth defined by United Nations Humanists who are atheists?

 

Walker lists  six characteristics of the IB educatgional program.  One of them has already been quoted above, Negotiation: the skill of persuading people to compromise or change their minds.  Another one he lists is "Criteria for truth: how do we judge what is right or wrong?  Do you want your children and our students being taught how to determine truth and right and wrong by United Nations  humanists who are atheists? 

 

 

Below  (or at this link) are many quotes from George Walker, Director General of  the International Baccalaureate Organization and the IB Educational Program from 1999 to 2005.

 

Debbie Pelley

dpelley@suddenlink.net

 

 

Following excerpts come from the article below: 

 

Description of International Baccalaureate (IB) Education by Director Himself

IB Is The Anti-Christian United Nations Education Program Being Implemented in Arkansas

 by 2005 Law

 

Biennial Conference of  IB Nordic Schools

 

Stockholm: 9 September 2005

 

What have I learned about international education?

 

 

Everything below is quoted excerpts directly from the speech in 2005 by  George Walker, IBO Director General of IBO from 1999 to 2005, given just before handing over the position to the next Director.  His entire speech can be found at this link: shttp://universities.ibo.org/ibo/index.cfm?contentid=54DF3F23-DA44-6BB7-59B5C0EC6D1C2566&method=display&language=EN

 

It is a great pleasure to be back in Scandinavia and a particular pleasure to be in Sweden. I have very special memories of previous meetings in Iceland and Denmark so thank you for inviting me once again to join you at your conference.

 

Not surprisingly, you find me in retrospective mood. At the end of this month I shall have been director general of the IBO for six years (which means it is now impossible to blame anyone else!) but quite soon after that – 1 January to be exact – I shall be handing over to my successor, Jeff Beard.

 

It is a good moment, therefore, to look back but instead of asking the obvious question, “What have I achieved?” I am going to ask the more intriguing question, “What have I learned?” and in particular, “What have I learned about international education?”

 

I am going to start back in 1991, long before I joined the IBO. I had been appointed director general of the International School of Geneva which (it would claim from time to time) had practically invented international education.

 

Anyway, my first opportunity to write on the subject (and remember that

for the previous 25 years I had worked in the national state system of education in Britain) came in 1995 and here are the six characteristics of international education that I thought important:

 

I shall be coming back to these six points, so do try to keep them in mind.

 

But first, I want to mention what I deliberately left out which included teaching groups of different nationalities, studying the history, geography and customs of other countries, arranging exchanges with foreign schools and having a strong modern languages department, though I did add that each of those might help.

 

Let me explain why I chose to exclude ‘teaching groups of different nationalities’ which

many would regard as a key feature of international education. [Walker goes on to explain that this part is just the first step and not the significant one..  See later excerpts.]

 

International awareness in education has become an important area of concern for politicians. Former US Secretary of Education, Richard Riley, expressed this in 2000 when he said, "I strongly believe that the growth of democracy, economic prosperity and economic stability throughout the world is linked to the advance of education. This is one of the strongest reasons why the United States should have an active and strong international education agenda. [Riley was Clinton's Secretary of Education]

 

and there will be very few developed countries that are not measuring their education systems against those in other countries, for example via PISA (Programme for International Student Assessment) which surveys every three years the knowledge and skills of 15-year old students in the principal industrialized countries. Indeed, to become part of PISA is a political aspiration for many developing countries.

 

in the United States where, in Friedman’s view, the quality of education is too poor to allow people to compete on what is slowly becoming a more level playing field.

 

So, I have learned that to be on the first rung of the ladder of international education is not enough. The best educated workforce is no longer just internationally aware. It has an understanding of the major influences that have consigned the concepts of the independent nation state, national company and national economy to the history books. I have learned that students need to be globally aware.

 

Step 3: The global citizen

There are three remaining items on that original list and those of you who are really paying attention will notice that I have changed their order! They have become

 

and these are going to take me up to the third level of my ladder where I learn what it means to be a ‘global citizen’.

 

For example, you will have noticed the emphasis on active learning in the WIS statement:

‘seeks out’, ‘examines’, ‘evaluates’, ‘mental flexibility’, ‘proactive’ and so on. At the heart of global citizenship is a lively mind but a mind that will be operating within boundaries defined by truth and falsehood. The sky is not the limit when it comes to exercising the intellect: our concept of truth will define the limits and that will need refocusing depending on the particular area of knowledge – scientific, mathematical, artistic, literary, ethical, religious and so on. That is why I have learned to appreciate the value of the Theory of Knowledge course in the education of the global citizen.

 

How would the IB get on, I wonder, if my successor were not American, but Chinese, educated exclusively in China? I seriously doubt whether the organization could sustain either culture shock because, in the end, much of what we do is not truly international, it has been developed from a very influential Western humanist tradition of learning.

 

So another thing I have learned about international education is that it is very rarely truly

international. For example, what view do we have of collaborative working which is an

important feature of many non-Western cultures? We seem to encourage it in the classroom and then punish it in the examination hall. How do we reconcile a spirit of inquiry with a patriarchal culture that values received wisdom and rote learning? [Not the reason for doing away with rote learning] How can a secular curriculum be adopted in country where religious faith, rather than empirical observation, defines the limits of truth? Is it possible to be a free-thinking individual, perhaps perceived as amoral, in a culture where the rules and rituals are unconditionally accepted and rigorously adhered to?

 

We have arrived at the third rung on the ladder: we have moved from the student who is

internationally aware, to one who is globally aware to one who is a true global citizen, the person who has the necessary intellectual skills, the cultural understanding and both the ability and the attitude that wants to shift another person’s position as well as their own. For me, citizenship implies action.

[Now the 2nd characteristic of IB used above now  makes sense.  That characteristic noted above by Walker is  

 

Perhaps the most important thing I have learned about international education is that it does not happen by chance, by some kind of mysterious osmosis. It is not caught; it is taught. In order to make this point I want, quite deliberately, to take you away from the IB with which you are so familiar and present you with Mme Maurette’s views which will be quite new. ..she urges her teachers to play down the whole concept of nationality, either as a source of pride or of pity. Let’s avoid all sentimentality, she says.

 

 She then argues the case for a new kind of geography which puts the students into contact with the whole world before they ever see a map of their own country. Individual maps are hopelessly misleading in their scale, she says, so the Swiss have no idea that the delta of the River Ganges is as large as Switzerland! The geography teacher (who conveniently happened to be her father) called the subject ‘international culture’ and spent much time getting each student to build up maps of the world. She had equally radical ideas about  history which, she insisted, should not be taught before the age of 12 if it was to avoid becoming a gallery of dubious national heroes. For the next six years it should become world history with events in India, China, Japan and the Middle East synchronized with those in

Europe.

 

I have skimmed over the surface of this unique publication because for my purpose today the details are unimportant. The important point I do want to make is that the curriculum of a school can be divided roughly into three elements. There is the

 

it is what we often remember most from our school experience

determine the transmission of norms and values.

 

Mme Maurette attacks on all three curriculum fronts: compulsory, extra and hidden realizing that each part must reinforce the others; there must be a consistency of message. But I particularly admire her courage in attacking the compulsory curriculum. “It’s not going to be any old history course; it’s going to be this special kind of history” and that, of course, is her legacy to the IBO and it is no coincidence that the IB Diploma Programme grew out of a syllabus and an examination called Contemporary World History.

 

But the IB can only do so much and within each element of the curriculum, and particularly in creating the hidden curriculum that determines the school’s values, it will be the teachers and the administrators who have an overwhelming influence. [This is why  staff development is so important – to train the teachers to be global citizens so they can pass it on.] The research of my colleagues a the University of Bath, Dr Mary Hayden and Professor Jeff Thompson, has confirmed that in the eyes of students, teachers and alumni who have experienced an international education, the international-mindedness of their teachers and a management regime value-consistent with an institutional international philosophy were two essential ingredients.

 

It is time to sum up. I have tried to trace a path within international education from being

internationally aware, to being globally aware to being a truly global citizen. I do not believe that international education is simplistically synonymous with ‘a high quality education’, nor do I believe that it happens by chance.  [In other words, good education is not the real goal; changing values and religious beliefs is real goal.]

 

George Walker

Director general

Geneva

August 2005

 

Other relevant information to the above:

 

The Diploma Programme and Middle Years Programme grew from a western humanist tradition, the increasing influence of non western cultures on all three programmes is not only being acknowledged, but is becoming increasingly significant. ("Continuum of  International Education, The Primary Years Programme, PYP, from the IBO website at this link: http://www.ibo.org/programmes/documents/continuum.pdf

 

In order to understand the philosophy of IB, it is vital to understand what the IBO means when it states: the IB Programme is rooted in a “western humanist tradition.

 

The U.S. Supreme Court recognized Humanism as a religion in 1961(Torasco v Watkins, 367, US488, June 19, 1961) As such, the American Humanist Association has its own

religious tax exemption and its own clergy (Humanist Celebrant).

 

The basic precepts of the Humanism include:

 

Humanist Manifesto II reads,

Ethics

THIRD: We affirm that moral values derive their source from human experience. Ethics is autonomous and situational needing no theological or ideological sanction. Ethics stems from human need and interest. To deny this distorts the whole basis of life. …We strive for the good life, here and now.

http://www.americanhumanist.org/about/manifesto2.html

Many kinds of humanism exist in the contemporary world. The varieties and emphases of naturalistic humanism include "scientific," "ethical," "democratic," "religious," and "Marxist" humanism. Free thought, atheism, agnosticism, skepticism, deism, rationalism, ethical culture, and liberal religion all claim to be heir to the humanist tradition. Humanism traces its roots from ancient China, classical Greece and Rome, through the Renaissance and the Enlightenment, to the scientific revolution of the modern world. But views that merely reject theism are not equivalent to humanism. They lack commitment to the positive belief in the possibilities of human progress and to the values central to it. Many within religious groups, believing in the future of humanism, now claim humanist credentials. Humanism is an ethical process through which we all can move, above and beyond the divisive particulars, heroic personalities, dogmatic creeds, and ritual customs of past religions or their mere negation.  http://www.americanhumanist.org/about/manifesto2.html  Humanist  Manifesto II, Preface

World Community

TWELFTH: We deplore the division of humankind on nationalistic grounds. We have reached a turning point in human history where the best option is to transcend the limits of national sovereignty and to move toward the building of a world community in which all sectors of the human family can participate. Thus we look to the development of a system of world law and a world order based upon transnational federal government. This would appreciate cultural pluralism and diversity.  http://www.americanhumanist.org/about/manifesto2.html Twelfth

 

THIRTEENTH: This world community must renounce the resort to violence and force as a method of solving international disputes. We believe in the peaceful adjudication of differences by international courts and by the development of the arts of negotiation and compromise. War is obsolete. So is the use of nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons. It is a planetary imperative to reduce the level of military expenditures and turn these savings to peaceful and people-oriented uses. http://www.americanhumanist.org/about/manifesto2.html  Thirteenth

 

As the IB’s philosophical foundation, Humanist beliefs permeate the curriculum. For example:Ian Hill, IBO Deputy Director General, states his case for moral relativism: “Values are learned, not inherited..  Education therefore performs a fundamental role as one of the factors which shapes values.  They do not exist in a vacuum, and they are not immutable; circumstances can cause one's beliefs to change. . http://www.unidir.org/pdf/articles/pdf-art53.pdf " Curriculum Development and Ethics in International Education" by Ian Hill, Deputy Director General of IBO.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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