www.afaar.org/HeadStartManualPromotes

 

Head  Start  Manual Promotes Witchcraft & Homosexuality

 

          As Arkansans and citizens across the nation are being hammered with propaganda that would make them receptive to statewide pre-kindergarten and expanded Head Start programs, they need to keep in mind the cost, an estimated initial partial cost of  $280 million dollars for the pre-kindergarten program alone  in Arkansas. But more importantly citizens need to remember the agenda of some very influential politicians who have made it a lifetime project to incorporate their values into our children.

           

             And even though the social liberals laid the foundation for these early childhood programs, they are now being promoted with fervor by many Republicans, including our present Governor, Mike Huckabee, and  our President, George Bush.  Integrity demands that even the supporters of these leaders hold these men accountable in areas where they are wrong.  The following facts need to be brought back to the publicís awareness in an effort to keep these programs from being implemented and/or expanded.

 

Clinton promotes homosexual education K-12

Head Start manual promotes witchcraft & homosexuality

 

          We have to broaden the imagination of America" to accept homosexuals as equals was the message in President Clinton's address to the Human Rights Campaign's (HRC - a gay lobby group) annual dinner in November, 1997.  Later the President and other speakers called for K-12 instruction aimed at teaching children tolerance of, among other things, the homosexual lifestyle.

 

            One method for accomplishing Clinton's mission already exists and is being used in Head Start programs in Little Rock, Russellville, and across the state and nation in the form of a teacher's manual that promotes the idea of cultural diversity, including tolerance for and acceptance of homosexual lifestyles and an appreciation for witchcraft.  The title of this manual is Anti-Bias Curriculum: Tools for Empowering Young Children., and it can be obtained by calling 1-800-424-2460.  This book is designed for children, ages 2 - 5 years of age and is listed as a multicultural curriculum  in National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) brochure.

 

            A Head Start speaker at the Arkansas Head Start Training Conference in Little Rock (celebrating the 30 year anniversary of Head Start) told the participants that every classroom should have a copy of this teacher's manual, and that it is used by Head Start's mental health coordinators.  The speaker further said that every elementary school associated with Head Start is given a copy of this book.  (See "A Head Start Or a Step Back", Arkansas Citizen November, 1995)

 

            Below are just a few of the numerous quotes from the above book that instruct teachers how to accomplish Clinton's goals.  

 

            "Read books about different ways families are organized. . .gay or lesbian families (two daddies or two mommies--you may decide not to use the words gay and lesbian, but the child deserves calm recognition of the reality of the composition of his family)"  p. 53

 

            "Depict various family lifestyles and incomes (...beware of using the large number of books that assume readers are Christian.)"  p 12

 

            "Have anatomically correct dolls available for the children in the dramatic play area and to be used for specific activities with the teachers...Some teachers and parents may strongly disagree with teacher talking about genitals, using correct anatomical terms, showing books with photos of the naked body... in the classroom." (p. 53.)  and then they explain how to handle parents who object.

 

            [In sections dealing with Holiday Activities for Halloween, children are encouraged to think of witches as good instead of bad.]  "Kay. . .What I know is that the real women we call witches weren't bad.  They really helped people.  These women lived a long time ago.  Maybe you know some good witches too?"  [Later the teacher sets up a witch-healer table, where the children can make their own potions, and she also teaches them a witch's chant accompanied by hand movements.] p. 90-91

 

            "(a) Ask parents who still disagree [with the activities in this book] if they are willing to have you carry out disputed activities, and then evaluate the results together for further discussion;  (b)  state that further discussion will be held, and that meanwhile the activities under disagreement will be held." (p 108)

 

            It should now be obvious to anyone why Clinton's administration is so serious about drastically expanding early day-care and Head Start programs.  Advocated among the President's top advisors is a national day care system costing as much as $100 billion annually.  These daycare centers would be "schools of the 21st century" or "family resource centers" where care schedules would be matched with parents' work schedules, children would attend before and after school programs, and summer programs for children up to age twelve would be mandatory for participating schools.

 

            Here in Arkansas forty-five families have been selected to test an Early Head Start program.  This new program focuses on the fetus, infant toddler, and parent, and provides nurturing meals, health care, parenting skills, and day care.  Children will spend 35 hours a week for the next five years at selected centers.  Pregnant women will also be enrolled in the Early Head Start program, proving this administration is trying to get more children at the earliest age possible away from their parents and into the hands of  the government.

 

            But how effective is the Head Start program for all the money it costs ($4200 per child per half day - 1994 figures).  The Clinton administration has pushed to expand Head Start to a full-day and year-round program to reflect the needs of working parents. (AP newspaper story .  According to a Department of Health and Human Services 1985 report, all existing research suggests that, "In the long run, cognitive and socio-emotional test scores of  former Head Start students do not remain superior to those of disadvantaged students who did not attend Head Start."

 

            (For more quotes from the above Anti Bias book, see next page.)

 

More Quotes

from Anti-Bias Curriculum:

Tools for Empowering Young Children book

            by Louije Derman-Sparks and the A.B.C. Task Force

For a copy of this book call NAEYC 1-800-424-2460

 

            The following quotes come from the above book which is a teacher's manual designed to help teachers implement an anti-bias curriculum.  It is designed for young children, ages 2-5 years of age and is listed along with other multicultural curriculum in an National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) brochure.  This book is being used in Head Start Programs across the nation and is being used in Little Rock and Russelville and probably many other areas in the state.  It was highly praised as a tool to promote mental wellness at the 30th Anniversary of Head Start Conference in Little Rock.  The presenter said every classroom should have a copy of this book.  She said every elementary school associated with Head Start is given a copy of this book through the First Steps program. (See "A Head Start Or a Step Back", Arkansas Citizen, November, 1995.) 

 

1.  Under section on "Holiday Activities In An Anti-Bias Curriculum" for Halloween, the following suggestions are given:  "Witches and Healers.  Day 1:  Kay asks 'what are your ideas about witches? ''Bad, ugly, old' is the children's unanimous response.  Kay:  'Many people do think that.  What I know is that the real women we call witches weren't bad. They really helped people.  These women lived a long time ago  Maybe you know about some good witches too?' (The only one the class can think of is Glinda in "The Wizard of Oz."1.  Kay:  'Yes, Glinda was pretty and helped people, but she didn't do what most of the women called witches did.  They healed people who were sick or hurt.' (The children start talking about doctors.)  Kay:  'Yes, the healers were like doctors.". . .Days 3,4,5 and 6:  Kay sets up a number of activities children can choose to do over the next week:  a 'witch-healer' table, where the children can make their own potions . . .After a week of these activities, Kay has another brief discussion with the children about witches. 'What do you know now about witch-healers?'  she asks.  The consensus is that witches fell into two categories.  Some were bad, some good.  So although the activities don't completely change the children's minds, they do stretch thinking by creating a category of  'some good witches.' (Later in the year, Kay raised the question of witches again to see what ideas the children have kept over time.  They still hold to the "some good/some bad witches" categories. (pp 90-91)

 

2.  On page 91 Kay teaches the children a witch's chant accompanied by hand movements.

 

3.  "Under section entitled "Expanding Awareness of Gender Roles" the following are some of the author's recommendations:  "Read books about different ways families are organized:  two parents; single parents; . . .gay or lesbian families (two daddies or two mommies--you may decide not to use the words gay and lesbian, but the child deserves calm recognition of the reality of the composition of his family.)" p. 53

 

4.  "Homophobia, the fear and hatred of gay men and lesbians, is another form of gender bias adults teach young children. . .They [children] become homophobic long before they understand what it is they fear. . .Homophobia:  A fear and hatred of gay men and lesbians backed up by institutional policies and power that discriminate against them" p. 3.

 

5.  In the visual aid section, another activity listed is as follows:  "Images of diversity in family styles; single mothers or fathers, extended families, gay or lesbian families (families with two mothers or fathers.)"  p. 12

 

6.  Under "Toys and Materials Section" this activity is recommended: "Depict various family lifestyles and incomes (beware of using only the large number of children's books picturing only families with two parents, and always with one parent of each sex;  beware of using the large number of books that assume readers are Christian." p. 12.

 

7.  Under "Beginnings: working with 2 year-olds the author says, "Diaper changing and toilet learning are two activities in the daily schedule where learning about sex identity spontaneously arises.  A lot of looking occurs; all the teacher has to do occasionally is casually say, 'Cindy has a vagina, Malcolm has a penis.'  As children acquire more language in general, they also begin making comments of their own:  'My mom doesn't have a penis, she has hair," pp 21-22

 

8.  Under "Working Together to Create Change" the author gives the following anecdote:  "Cory:  In the preschool we did an action around the multicultural dolls we bought from Lakeshore. . .The children felt that they would prefer to really know if the dolls were boys or girls.  So, I suggested that we write to Lakeshore and tell them about our concern.  The group dictated a letter, we sent it, and a few weeks later Lakeshore offered to replace our dolls with a new set that did have genitals.  I felt hat this was a very successful activity."  p. 79

 

9.  Under "Gender Anatomy and Gender Identity" the following is suggested, "Have anatomically correct dolls available for the children in the dramatic play area and to be used for specific activities with the teachers . . . Some teachers and parents may strongly disagree with teachers' talking about genitals, using correct anatomical terms, showing books with photos of the naked body, or even using anatomically correct dolls in the classroom.  Chapter 11, 'Working with Parents,' discusses strategies for talking and problem solving with parents if this issue comes up." p. 53

 

10.  In the section entitled "When Teachers and Parents Disagree" the author states:  "(a)  Ask parents who still disagree if they are willing to have you carry out disputed activities, and then evaluate the results together for further discussion; (b) state that further discussions will be held, and that meanwhile the activities under disagreement will be held." p. 108

 

            Please share this information with friends and legislators.

 

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